Living Colour @ Glasgow Garage 07/03/13

LivingColour-ARTICLETwenty years ago a 17-year-old me saw Living Colour in the Glasgow Barrowlands. It was their ‘Stain’ tour and I’d already been a fan for many years; though I’d never seen them.

As impressionable as I was at that age I couldn’t help think they were fantastic. Corey Glover’s vocal, Vernon Reid’s guitar playing, and Doug Wimbish’s bass. Did I mention Will Calhoun yet? Hell there was just such an impressive array of musicians on that stage. A few years past, and the band split up. I honestly thought I’d never see them again.

Twenty years later (almost to the day) and the band (who reformed several years back) are playing the city for the first time since that ‘Stain’ show. This time around they are playing their debut album Vivid in its entirety. How are they going to sound? Can they be as good as the wet behind the ears me, thought they were back then? What has changed?

This time the band is playing the somewhat smaller Glasgow Garage. At a little over 8:45 the band hit the stage and stumble into an unfamiliar groove which seems to play and play and play, not really going anywhere. It did feel like an intro-jam at first, but after close to ten minutes the crowd are a bit restless. The sound is good, Corey’s vocal is as impressive as ever, but (as it turns out) this Robert Johnson cover just isn’t cutting it with the crowd. The song finished to over-zealous applause and the band say “Hi!” and start the next track.

Yet again, unknown music begins. This time around it is Jimi Hendrix Experience’s ‘Power of Soul’. More time passes, and those of us familiar with the venue’s strict curfew are starting to worry already; it is now after 9 and by normal standards gigs in here have to finish by 10pm! I thought Vivid was getting played tonight?

Without much time for worry it is after those two tracks that Corey properly addresses the crowd telling us that it was 25 years ago that Vivid was released. “That means that we’re old. Of course it also means that they are older! Tonight we will play the album in its entirety.” Someone in the crowd shouts “Get the spandex out!!” – a reference to the band’s choice of attire when the album was originally released. Corey replies, “That’s how I know it’s older. As I’m not stupid enough to put that shit back on!” No sooner had he said the words, or had the very loud cheer risen and we get to hear the words of Malcolm X, “. . . And during the few moments that we have left, . . . ” The venue explodes to the guitar riff which follows!

For the next hour and a bit we are treated to the album sounding fresher than I ever remember it being. The musicianship is amazing, the vocals stunning – the talent in this band is unbelievably good. Highlights include Corey Glover singing ‘Amazing Grace’ before a rousing, crowd-participation version of ‘Open Letter (To A Landlord)’ and ‘Funny Vibe’ including a snippet of Public Enemy’s ‘Fight The Power’.

As we move through the track list Vernon tells us that the next song is about the same girl as ‘Love Rears It’s Ugly Head’ was written about. Except this was written first about the end of the relationship, you know, in a sort of “Tarantino order”. That song was ‘Broken Hearts’.

‘Which Way To America?’ goes on for a good 10-15 minutes with an extended interlude about getting a VCR and taking a Casio watch from an audience member. Given they were already over curfew (10:30 tonight), with someone at the side of the stage making wild gestures to them to wrap it up, it’s a miracle they were allowed back onstage to play an encore.

The encore (after a weird jam moment which included Doug playing an electric “stick”) was of course ‘Love Rears It’s Ugly Head’. Then it was all over with Corey saying, “It might not be what you remember but we don’t remember much either!!!”

The set list for the night included four more songs, ‘Leave It Alone’, ‘Bi’, ‘Go Away’ (all from Stain), and ‘Time’s Up’ from their second album of the same name. Of course with a venue that has such a strict curfew, the time needed to play these songs was wasted with a set which included two cover songs at the start (especially when they seemed so at odds with the rest of the show) and a number of extended jam-versions of songs. Don’t get me wrong, the jams were superb and if the band enjoys playing covers then great, but when time was against them from the outset they seemed entirely superfluous inclusions.

Whilst having to drop four of their own songs from the set in favour of two (misplaced?) covers at the start shouldn’t detract from how amazing this band sounded tonight. Better than in 1993 – my 17 year-old self did recognise talent when it saw it, it seems – and Vivid is a fantastic album to hear live. The band said they would be back again, and I do hope they come back and get to play whatever full set list they wanted to, and not being curtailed by venue curfews.

The lasting thoughts though are that they were even better this time around, and has it really been 25 years!?

Living Colour Setlist The Garage, Glasgow, Scotland 2013, Vivid 25th Anniversary

Gareth Fraser

Editor-in-Chief and Owner of Musicscramble. Obsessed with music from a young age, over 1000 gigs under his belt, a serious record collecting habit, a love of concert photography and alphabetising his CD collection.

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4 thoughts on “Living Colour @ Glasgow Garage 07/03/13

  1. This show is for old and new fans. Preachin Blues is going to be on the next album. Power Of Soul is a Hendrix classic kills. Really? Your bitchin about that because all u have is cult of personality on your mind! This ain’t green day or any other shitembandmthat plays,the same song same solo same bullshit night after night. The show was great, this review is kinda garbage, fuck the garage for having a dumbass dance party afterwords. Glasgow was treated to the first show of the tour. Awesome. This review blows

    • Well, not quite.

      Thanks for your comment and opinion. As a huge Living Colour fan, I can easily see past the ‘hits’ and enjoy the diversity of the music across their five albums which I own. But that’s the beauty of opinion; I’m entitled to a different one from others!

      I think you’ll find the issue I had was that due to the venue (which you so eloquently described your opinion of) the band had to cut out so many other album tracks, but opted to play covers up first. Ironic then that you feel I only had ‘Cult…’ on my mind when I got to hear that. Shouldn’t I then be ecstatic?

      Hell the band can play what they like, and did. The gig was amazing, the musicianship fantastic, and I said that clearly. Therefore not 100% sure why this review ‘blows’ since we are both saying it was great to see them in Glasgow. However had I not felt that the show was great, then I would have written so. What’s the point of only writing reviews which are always 100% complimentary for the sake of it? Surely they should just be honest.

      Still, appreciate the time you took to share your views.

  2. The show was great. Sure it had its ups n downs. I’ve seen the band multiple times in London. They jam out a lot. It’s expected. This isn’t some beat coordinated Chili Peppers show where the artists aren’t willing to challenge themselves where every minute is coordinated. While, the drum solos and bass solos (God, i hate Bi and it’s 15-min jam – so happy they didn’t play it!) are a bit of a pain in the ass, Preachin’ Blues was money! It’s the first show of the tour. Corey was out w/ Galactic 2 days prior. They rehearsed (fully) weeks before the show. (sorry, i follow all of them on fb) I get it… Let them warm their chops, warm up vocals on a few tunes, then get down to the nitty gritty. and as Titan says… Fuck the garage dance party… wankers!

    • Absolutely! It was a great gig, and I suspected the intro songs were there as a warm up. My complaint was always around those tracks and the extended jams eating into the very limited time.

      I know what you mean about Bi and the solos; pretty much my point exactly. Very much looking forward to them coming back again though.